Do you Lie? Commit Fraud? Or Just Stop Treating the Patient?

Posted · Add Comment

A patient has bedsores. You dress the sore, adminster medicine, and the bedsores get better… until it reaches a certain point and then it goes into what’s called stasis, That means the wound does not get better, does not get worse, it just stays the same. If you can work your way through that, then it starts getting better again and even heal. Now the problem is that Medicare regulations forbid you to come if you’re not making a difference. So, if the wound stays the same and you document that it’s the same, then you have to stop taking care of the patient. You can’t come in and care for them anymore. What do you, as a nurse, do?

Join Compass Clinical at AONE Inspiring Leaders 2016 Conference!

Posted · Add Comment

Compass Clinical Consulting representatives Christopher Martorella, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, Principal; Jim Mahon, PhD, Managing Director; and Leah Curtin, RN, DSc(h), FAAN, Senior Advisor, will be present, along with thousands of nurse leaders, at the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) 2016 Conference from March 30-April 2 at the Fort Worth Convention Center in Fort Worth, […]

Top Clinical Expert Perspectives Posts for 2015

Posted · Add Comment

The top posts for 2015 on the Compass Clinical Expert Perspectives journals are below. Leading the pack were several articles on the care of mental patients in the ER.In a time when approximately 50% of American patients will have some sort of mental health issue diagnosed in their lifetime, there are concerns across the continuum as every unit in a given hospital will at some point need to address mental health concerns with their patients.

Hospital Leaders Like to Think that “Immediate Jeopardy Can’t Happen Here” — Until it Does

Posted · Add Comment

Despite state and federal regulations, and private hospital accreditation programs that try to ensure high-quality care, errors occur in hospitals that result in patient injuries. Many errors are due to process failures rather than unpredictable accidents. Process failures can result in harm or, at best, missed opportunities to provide good care. Managers must remain vigilant by employing comprehensive monitoring programs that ensure protocols don’t slip.

Care for your Patients as You Would for Yourself

Posted · Add Comment

I don’t know how closely you have been following the field of quantum physics, but (indirectly) there is a lot it has to say about therapeutic relation­ships, some of which is clearly foretold in Hildegard Peplau’s work, especially her belief that the nurse used herself as a therapeutic tool. At any rate, here is a […]

Nurses Bring Energy and Focus to Patients

Posted · Add Comment

Jill Bolte Taylor, a Harvard-trained neuroanato­mist, experienced a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain in 1996. On the afternoon of this rare form of stroke (arteriovenous malformation), she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. It took eight years for her to recover all of her functions […]

Intraprofessional Relationships Essential for Nursing Practice

Posted · Add Comment

It’s not hard to believe that the people we are drawn to and spend our time with affect our own actions and overall identity, even if in subtle ways. This alteration starts in the brain but is evidenced physically. Ongoing exposure to one person’s attractors does not merely activate neural patterns in another, it also […]

Our Relationships Affect our Views

Posted · Add Comment

Many people have asked (actually half-asked and half-complained) how they can get someone else to practice the kind of focused attention and intention I have written about in previous columns. To answer this question briefly and frankly: you cannot. That is, you cannot make anyone else do anything as intensely interior as focusing their attention […]

Patients’ Will and Practitioners’ Power: Finding the Balance

Posted · Add Comment

Codes of ethics came into being to protect the vulnerable from the powerful, the unwary from the unscrupulous. The very word “profession” was derived from the early practitioners’ public promise of altruism and master craftsmanship—which today is often codified in our practice acts. Yet, now as then, the complete situation for patients includes not only […]

Shared Values in a Vulnerable World

Posted · Add Comment

In recent years, most of the world’s people have begun to celebrate their diversity: different races and languages, religions and cultures, and social mores. People have learned to embrace these differences as what makes life infinitely interesting. Nonetheless, what people value most in life is remarkably similar. People love their children, seek good friends, need […]

Expert Clinical Perspectives: Top 10 Roundup

Posted · Add Comment

Did you miss any of these top articles? “Understanding the Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP),”; “The Hospital Utilization Management Committee (UMC) – CMS Condition of Participation (CoPS) Requirement,”; “Improving Treatment of Mental Health Patients in the Emergency Department (ED),”; “Four Common EMTALA Vulnerabilities Hospitals Should Know … But Probably Don’t,”; and…